Curriculum Overview

Contents

1.0 Curriculum Intent ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..3 1.1 Overview ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..3 1.2 Strengths ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..3 1.3 Local Context ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 1.4 Challenges to Learning……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………4 1.5 Rationale for Exceptional Young Men………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4 1.6 Rationale for the Home-School Agreement………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4 1.7 Rationale for School Values……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4 1.8 Rationale for the Three Aspects of Curriculum Intent…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5

2.0 Curriculum Implementation………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..6 2.1 Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..6 2.2 Content Overview………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….6 2.3 Life Skills………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………6 2.4 Personal Development and Character ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 2.5 SMSC …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..7 2.6 Cultural Capital ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..7 2.6 British Values………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..7 2.7 Personal Safety and Healthy Living……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………7 2.8 Aspirations……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………7

3.0 Curriculum Impact ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 3.1 Pupil Outcomes……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..8 3.2 Pupil Destinations …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

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1.0 Curriculum Intent

1.1 Overview

The curriculum is a framework for setting out the aims of a programme of education, including the knowledge and understanding to be gained at each stage (intent); for translating that framework over time into a structure and narrative, within an institutional context (implementation) and for evaluating what knowledge and understanding students have gained against expectations (impact/achievement).

The intent of the curriculum is synonymous with many of the Academy’s core aims to build exceptional young men. An exceptional young man will embrace every opportunity and leave Audenshaw School highly employable and ready to make a positive contribution to society.

  • To provide a challenging, engaging and enjoyable curriculum that leads to the highest levels of achievement for all students, especially the more-able.

  • To provide opportunities for all students to develop a high level of literacy and numeracy required for success in adult life.

  • To broaden students’ horizons through a range of spiritual, moral, social and cultural opportunities.

  • To ensure that all students are able to thrive and develop to become exceptional young men.

  • To maintain an absolute commitment to ensuring the safety of all students and staff.

  • To develop all students to be respectful, to take responsibility and to show resilience to prepare them to make a positive contribution to society.

  • To provide an appropriate range of skills, opportunities and experiences to raise aspirations enabling students to succeed in their future learning or

    employment.

    1.2 Strengths

  • Broad-and-balanced KS3 curriculum designed to develop competencies to equip students for later learning.

  • SMSC and cultural capital opportunities embedded into the learning journeys for all subjects.

  • Extended KS4 programme to permit a deeper understanding of content and skills.

  • KS4 programme that allows all students to achieve across the most appropriate range of subjects, including the EBacc for some.

  • Bespoke Life Skills programme designed to promote respect, taking responsibility and to develop resilience and so prepare students for adult life.

  • Comprehensive CEIAG support for all students from Year 7 to Year 11 meeting the Gatsby benchmarks.

    1.3 Local Context

  • High levels of deprivation and low social mobility evidenced by social mobility index (487 out of 533). Tameside’s index of multiple deprivation rank is 23 out of 317

  • Lack of opportunity for new jobs in the area despite investment from large local businesses, for example Brother.

  • White working-class boys (lowest performing group nationally) make up the majority of our students. Despite this background, the school’s GCSE

    results are top 5% nationally.

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1.4 Challenges to Learning

  • Passivity in lessons and a lack of resilience when there is an increase in challenge. To some students, mediocre is good enough especially for some of the more able (not necessarily most able) and this is reflected in student voice and outcomes.

  • Lack of aspirations with some students prepared to access 16-18 courses that are not appropriate for their qualifications. Reluctance to travel further for better courses.

  • Inconsistent investment in education from some parents/carers who do not support the work of the school.

    1.5 Rationale for Exceptional Young Men

  • The school promotes the concept of ‘exceptional young men’ to develop traits and characters to overcome disadvantages and outperform peers.

  • Students do achieve GCSE grades significantly in excess of national expectations based on prior attainment. However, students need to strive to BEYM

    to overcome the social barriers and lack of professional networks that they will face in the competitive workplace.

  • The extra-curricular offer, LORIC lessons and the curriculum present opportunities to develop the following skills to stand out from their peers:

Leadership * Organisation * Resilience * Initiative * Communication

1.6 Rationale for the Home-School Agreement

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An exceptional young man will consistently demonstrate the three school values.
An exceptional young man will work tirelessly to reach his full potential and achieve success.

An exceptional young man will always remember with pride that they are an “Audenshaw Boy”.

1.7 Rationale for School Values

The three school values address the school’s contextual challenges.

This statement reinforces the need for students to be resilient and addresses aspirations and passivity.

The last statement is the measure when students have met the previous statements and remember being part of something extraordinary.

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An exceptional young man will embrace every opportunity and leave Audenshaw as a highly employable young man ready to make a positive contribution to society.

“embracing opportunity” addresses passivity, “highly employable” addresses aspirations and social mobility, “positive contribution” promotes being active giving something back.

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  • Boys need respect and discipline and research shows they respond well to that.

  • Resilience is needed to combat apathy, passivity and lack of aspirations that have been described as the challenges above.

  • Responsibility is needed to improve student and parental engagement – the school is doing very well but students/parents are inconsistent.

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1.8 Rationale for the Three Aspects of Curriculum Intent

CHALLENGE is in response to passivity and lower aspirations of particularly some of the more-able whose achievement is relatively lower.

Each aspect addresses the local context and school challenges and particularly helps ensure the second statement is fulfilled in terms of “working tirelessly to reach full potential”.

The broad-and-balanced school curriculum stimulates students’ interests with a blend of academic subjects, creative subjects and PE to continuously engage and challenge students’ thinking.

‘Cultural capital’ opportunities highlighted in subject learning journeys to enable students to absorb greater general knowledge and competences . This leads to greater social mobility whatever their starting point.

ENGAGE is linked also to passivity. Lessons are productive and teaching is high quality leading to strong outcomes, but some students are passive.

ENJOY is a response to the dryness of the curriculum previously in some subjects where, although not teaching GCSE, the emphasis was strongly on focussing and preparing for the GCSE.

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2.0 Curriculum Implementation 2.1 Policies

The curriculum is implemented in accordance with the following documents:

Curriculum Map

Homework Policy

Marking Policy

Teaching and Learning Policy

2.2 Content Overview

The KS3 content and KS4 content are detailed in the subject learning journeys below:

Art
Computing and ICT Design Technology English
Geography
History
Maths
Music
PE
RE
Science

2.3 Life Skills

The Life Skills Programme is delivered through the timetable in Year 7 and Year 8 and drop-down days in Year 9, Year 10 and Year 11.

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2.4 Personal Development and Character

Enrichment and extra-curricular are communicated to students in form time, around school and home every half term. Extensive extracurricular provision (and participation) is an integral part of the wider curriculum.

2.5 SMSC

The school recognises that the personal development of the students, spiritually, morally, socially and culturally, plays a significant part in their ability to learn and achieve. Opportunities for SMSC are highlighted in the subject learning journeys.

2.6 Cultural Capital

Cultural capital is the accumulation of knowledge, behaviours, and skills that a student can draw upon and which demonstrates their cultural awareness, knowledge and competence; it is one of the key ingredients a student will draw upon to be successful in society, their career and the world of work. It is understanding the best of what has been said or done. Cultural capital can promote social mobility and success when overcoming barriers in our society. Opportunities for developing Cultural Capital are highlighted in the subject learning journeys.

2.6 British Values

The school has a duty to ‘actively promote’ the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

2.7 Personal Safety and Healthy Living

Student safety and wellbeing is of paramount importance. Personal safety is delivered as part of the life skills curriculum to all year groups. Safety, wellbeing and personal ethics are discussed and debated at length in KS4 ethical debate. Awareness is raised all through the year through assemblies, break-out sessions and theme weeks.

Safeguarding policy

Acceptable usage policy

2.8 Aspirations

The Academy provides a range of opportunities and experiences, which are tailored to allow students to succeed in the next stage in their education, training or employment.

Careers Education and Guidance policy

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3.0 Curriculum Impact 3.1 Pupil Outcomes

Locally, the Academy is the highest performing non-selective school for boys – Progress 8 Score.
The government has announced that it will not publish data based on tests or exams for 2020. The most recent data for 2019 can be found below.

3.2 Pupil Destinations

The most recently published data in the School and College Performance Tables is the 2019 cohort.
The percentage of students in sustained education, employment or training is 97% vs. a national average of 94% (+3%). ‘Moving on ’Report

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